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Upcoming talks

Spring semester at the University of Minnesota will conclude in about a month, and I am already busy assembling my summer schedule. So far, it’s looking great!

I hope to meet up with Education Futures readers at each of these events. Contact me if you’ll be in town for any of the above talks!

Road trip 3.0

Posting at Education Futures has been somewhat sparse as I’ve been taking Education 3.0 and the Society 3.0 framework on a road trip in Latin America, China, and now: Czech Republic. Over the next few days, I will meet with faculty and students at Charles University (Prague), Masaryk University (Brno), and Metropolitan University in Prague. Funding for the latest visit is provided by the University of Minnesota’s Alexander Dubcek travel award.

Thanks go to Dr. Eva Janebová for translating the Education 3.0 heuristics into Czech:

More soon…

Thank you!

The e-competencies conference is over –and, by all measures, it seems to be a resounding success! Many, many thanks go to Cristóbal Cobo and Jutta Treviranus for the co-organization of the event.

I am particularly grateful for our amazing participants. A few of their presentations are already online:

  • Martín Parselis (Video) [UCA]
  • Guillermo Lutzky (Video) [ORT]
  • Tom Elko (Video) [Independent Media Producer]
  • Janet Murphy (Video) [UToronto]
  • Miguel Raimilla (Video) [ONE ROOF ]
  • Florencio Ceballos (Video) [IDRC]
  • Suzanne Miric and Patrick Walker (Video) [UMN / METAMORF Tech.]
  • Roberto Balaguer (Video) [U de la R ]
  • Pablo Muñoz (Video 1 and 2 ) [UDD]
  • Germania Rodríguez (Video) [UTPL]
  • Víctor Zárate and Marilú Casas (Video ) [ITESM]
  • Jorge Silva (Video) [U.Toronto]
  • Jayson Richardson (Video) [UMN]
  • Stian Haklev (Video) [U.Toronto
  • Edgardo Lurig (Video) (ICT Policy Advisor of RNTC and UCSF)

Also, we had some great real-time presentations. Cristóbal Cobo posted many of our slide sets at Issuu:

Finally, I wish to express my gratitude to the amazing support team at FLACSO-México that made the conference possible, especially Ana Karla Romeu, Aarón Láscarez, Javier Cruz, Edgar Gutierrez, Déborah Monroy and Marduk Pérez de Lara. Thank you all!

On top of all these thank you’s, additional thanks goes to Cristóbal Cobo for compiling above lists of presentations.

Teaching Society 3.0 kids

I’m back from the ASOMEX technology conference in Monterrey, where we had a series of conversations on educating children of the 21st century. Our discussions were focused on the effective and purposive use of technologies in schools, and were joined by educators at private, English-language schools throughout Mexico.

My presentation focused on building education for a future society that is emerging rapidly, which I label “Society 3.0.” My key point is that schools that are built for the industrial era (Society 1.0), are ill-equipped to teach Society 3.0 kids. More importantly:

You can view slides from my presentation here. Also, Cristóbal Cobo posted his thoughts from the conference at e-rgonomic.

A "New" Minnesota Miracle

This morning, the Star Tribune published a piece on a push by DFL legislators for a “New Minnesota Miracle,” through an injection of $2.5 billion into K-12 education in Minnesota. From the article:

The plan would pour money into basic education funding for schools to use as they see fit. There also would be more money to cover school special education costs, pay for all-day kindergarten for everyone who wants it, and reimburse schools for some of their lost revenues due to declining enrollments.

When I saw the phrase, “a New Minnesota Miracle,” I thought, “hmmm… that sounds familiar.” When I saw state Rep. Denise Dittrich’s name associated with the push, I thought that name sounded familiar, too. So, I did a little digging through the Education Futures archives, and discovered that Arthur Harkins and I presented a pathway for a second Minnesota Miracle to the House E-12 Education Committee Working Group on High School Redesign, chaired by Rep. Dittrich:

A key difference between the Leapfrog pathway and Dittrich’s scheme is that Leapfrog calls for no new money (or very little new money) to be injected into K-12 education by the state. Rather, as knowledge-producing institutions, schools and communities would be encouraged to develop new economic models for funding K-12 education by bonding schools with the innovative workforce. Following our presentation with the working group last January, we were asked how much money did we want. We said nothing – and the panel was astonished. Is it possible that innovation in education can be accomplished without legislative intervention?

At least she’s not calling her spending plan “Leapfrog.”

(And, yes, I think K-12 education need to be fully funded. I just don’t agree that we should expect money to create a miracle… unless if we have a plan. Our plan is Leapfrog.)

"3G" education

Gustavo Andrade at UNAM in Mexico City just posted a video from a conference I participated in last April. He writes:

3G technology allows us to build an innovative vision of education. Education anywhere and at anytime, with a device that can be your own cell phone. John Moravec at the University of Minnesota explains the features of this form of learning, compared with that which is practiced among the brick walls that make up the classroom. For his part, Cristóbal Cobo of FLACSO-México explains that students and teachers must learn to unlearn in order to innovate in their teaching practices, and learn to respond to the accelerated pace of today’s digital revolution. If you want to know where is this “ubiquitous” information society in schools, take your time to see and hear this video. greetings

Off to Destination ImagiNation Global Finals

Today, I will arrive in Knoxville, TN, to interact with organizers and competing youth at the Destination ImagiNation Global Finals! Destination ImagiNation (DI) is a creativity and problem solving program for children from elementary age to college age. Teams of up to seven members compete in various challenges that require complex thinking, problem solving, teamwork and creativity. The goal of the program is to teach creative and critical thinking, presentation skills, problem solving, and teamwork skills. This year, a record 1,032 youth teams from throughout the world converge on this southern American city to compete for honors in the world’s largest critical thinking and creative problem solving competition. Arthur Harkins and I will present at a couple sessions.

DI is another pathway for breaking away from mediocrity in education. I will report more from the road. It should be fun!

Slides from this morning's MACTA presentation

From this morning’s MACTA keynote address: Co-constructing Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century

Career and Technical Education is poised at the inflection point of a technological and social change process identified as the “J” Curve. Just like the letter J, the “J” Curve describes a sharp upward turn in the exponentially accelerating rate of change. The effects of the “J” Curve will be felt -indeed, are already being felt- by every institution, company, government, and school in all societies. This presentation centers on the leadership that can be exerted by Career and Technical Education in the context of the “J” Curve’s increasing impacts.

To view the slides in a larger format, click here.